Growing Whole: The Psychosynthesis Approach
 

 

What is Psychosynthesis?

In its most basic sense, psychosynthesis is simply a name for the process of personal growth: the natural tendency in each of us to harmonize or synthesize our various aspects at ever more inclusive levels of organization.

In its more specific sense, Psychosynthesis is a name for the conscious attempt to cooperate with the natural process of personal development.

All living things contain within them a drive to evolve, to become the fullest realization of themselves. This process can be supported consciously, and psychosynthesis is one means to do this.

Cooperating effectively with this process can be assisted by a conceptual understanding of the nature of this evolution, and by practical techniques. Psychosynthesis provides these and integrates them into an inclusive and ever-growing framework designed to support the individual, groups, and the planet in their process of unfolding.

As an inclusive approach to human growth, Psychosynthesis dates from 1911 and the early work of Roberto Assagioli, an Italian Psychiatrist. Though one of the pioneers of psychoanalysis in Italy, Assagioli maintained that Freud had not given sufficient weight to the “higher” aspects of the human personality, and recognized a need for a more inclusive concept of humanity.

From this beginning Assagioli and an increasing number of psychotherapists, educators, physicians, social workers, clergy, and others have worked to develop and refine this inclusive view of human growth. The task is considered to be an open one, one that will never by finished.

Our Goals

We are committed to:

  • training, nurturing and supporting a new generation of Psychosynthesis Coaches and Psychosynthesis practitioners.
     
  • promoting, partnering, collaborating and contributing to the expansion of psychosynthesis education and training both in the Northeast region and beyond.
     
  • building a community that contributes to the growth, development and sharing of psychosynthesis tools, research and dissemination.
 This star image is often used to describe the six psychological functions: thinking, emotion, impulse/desire, intuition, sensation, and imagination.

This star image is often used to describe the six psychological functions: thinking, emotion, impulse/desire, intuition, sensation, and imagination.